Typhoon Hinnamnor replenishes major reservoirs in Taiwan

09/04/2022 08:58 PM
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The Feitsui Reservoir with increased water levels on Sunday. Photo courtesy of the Taipei Feitsui Reservoir Administration
The Feitsui Reservoir with increased water levels on Sunday. Photo courtesy of the Taipei Feitsui Reservoir Administration

Taipei, Sept. 4 (CNA) Typhoon Hinnamnor has replenished two major reservoirs in northern Taiwan and raised the water level of Keelung River, temporarily easing the water shortage Keelung had been facing, according to the Water Resources Agency (WRA).

With the heavy rainfall brought by the storm, WRA data showed a significant increase in water levels at Shimen Reservoir in Taoyuan and Feitsui Reservoir in New Taipei, ensuring steady water supply to the Greater Taipei area until at least the end of 2022.

According to Taipei Feitsui Reservoir Administration, the reservoir received 446.1 millimeters of rainwater from Thursday to Sunday noon.

The rainfall has already added 57.26 million cubic meters of water to the reservoir, raised its water level by nearly 7.5 meters and boosted capacity from 57.42 percent to 74.48 percent.

The administration added that the water level was still rising as of press time, with a further 42.74 million cubic meters of water still forecast, which will bring the total amount of rainwater received to around 100 million cubic meters and boost the reservoir to 88 percent capacity.

Meanwhile, Shimen Reservoir received over 330 millimeters of rainwater, raising its water level to more than 92 percent of full capacity, causing the reservoir management to discharge water.

The discharge also gave the WRA's Northern Region Water Resources Office an opportunity to activate the newly-built Amuping Sediment-Sluice Tunnel for the first time to stress test the capabilities of the project.

The Shimen Reservoir discharging water on Sunday. Photo courtesy of Northern Region Water Resources Office; Water Resources Agency
The Shimen Reservoir discharging water on Sunday. Photo courtesy of Northern Region Water Resources Office; Water Resources Agency

In Keelung, however, the typhoon failed to significantly improve the water level at Xinshan Reservoir in Keelung, according to Taiwan Water Corp.

Keelung has recently faced water shortages, with the Ministry of Economic Affairs previously announcing that water pressure would be lowered in the city from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. every day starting Saturday.

Although the typhoon failed to increase the water level at Xinshan Reservoir, Taiwan Water Corp. said the water shortage in the city has been eased, as the storm greatly boosted the water level of Keelung River.

However, the state-owned utility did not say whether the water supply control measure has been or will be lifted.

According to WRA data, the water level of Keelung River passed 63 meters as of 8:30 a.m. Sunday, prompting the administration to activate Yuanshanzi Flood Diversion Tunnel to discharge water.

Taiwan Water explained that the replenishing of the river is beneficial to Xinshan Reservoir, as it serves as an an off-stream reservoir, adding that water is generally diverted from the river and pumped into the reservoir.

However, the utility noted that although water will be diverted to the reservoir over the next few days, Keelung residents should continue to use water cautiously to prevent another dry spell.

While the typhoon brought a considerable amount of rain to northern Taiwan, southern Taiwan had less rainfall. Nevertheless, reservoirs in the south still received enough rain to be able to provide southern parts of Taiwan with water until at least the end of November, a WRA official told CNA.

For example, Tsengwen Reservoir in Tainan received less rainfall than reservoirs in the north, but its water level still rose to above 50 percent capacity after receiving 123.6 millimeters of rainwater.

Currently the reservoir has received 15.53 million cubic meters of water, with the total over the next few days expected to reach about 21 million cubic meters.

The Tsengwen Reservoir with replenished water levels on Sunday. Photo courtesy of South Region Water Resources Office; Water Resources Agency
The Tsengwen Reservoir with replenished water levels on Sunday. Photo courtesy of South Region Water Resources Office; Water Resources Agency

In contrast, Tainan's Nanhua Reservoir has begun discharging water as it was close to full capacity before the typhoon.

As of 6 p.m., water continued to flow out of the reservoir.

In order to ensure stable water supply until the end of November, the WRA called on the public to continue to use water conservatively.

(By Chang Ai, Kao Hua-chien, Wu Jui-chi, Huang Li-yun and James Lo)

Enditem/AW

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