Taiwan expresses interest in proposed U.S.-led trade pact

12/08/2021 10:35 PM
To activate the text-to-speech service, please first agree to the privacy policy below.
From left: Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, President Tsai Ing-wen, AmCham Taipei Chairman C.W. Chin and AIT Taipei Office Director Sandra Oudkirk. CNA photo Dec. 8, 2021
From left: Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, President Tsai Ing-wen, AmCham Taipei Chairman C.W. Chin and AIT Taipei Office Director Sandra Oudkirk. CNA photo Dec. 8, 2021

Taipei, Dec. 8 (CNA) President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) on Wednesday expressed her government's interest in taking part in a proposed Indo-Pacific economic framework the United States is looking to launch early next year.

"We look forward to taking part in the recently announced Indo-Pacific economic framework," Tsai said at an event in Taipei that celebrated the 70th anniversary of the American Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan (AmCham).

Tsai was keen to underline Taiwan's credentials as a trade partner, saying the island had made itself a tech hub for Asia and also built a flexible and diverse economy that would allow the country to play a crucial role in the proposed pact.

According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, talks on the proposed framework are in the preliminary stages.

Reuters reported in November that the U.S. government was planning to launch the framework early next year, citing comments made by U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo during a press event.

At that time, Raimondo said the proposed framework would not be akin to a traditional trade agreement, emphasizing that it could involve such areas as the digital economy, supply chain resiliency, infrastructure, export control, and clean energy.

Meanwhile, Director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) Taipei Office Sandra Oudkirk said the U.S. had resolved to deepen cooperation with Taiwan across various economic and commercial issues, ranging from supply chains to emerging technologies.

Without elaborating, Oudkirk also said that the AIT intended to establish a business advisory group to provide recommendations to both Taiwan and the U.S. on ways to enhance bilateral economic and commercial ties.

Describing Taiwan as a critical security partner, the director said a growing focus for bilateral cooperation would be countering cybersecurity threats.

"We must work together to build a culture of cybersecurity that includes business, government, academia, and society at large," she said, adding that good data and reliable information served as the foundation of democratic systems and national security.

The AIT represents the U.S. interests in Taiwan in the absence of diplomatic ties between the two countries.

Established in 1951, AmCham is a business organization representing about 1,000 members from more than 500 U.S. and international companies.

(By Teng Pei-ju)

Enditem/ASG

    We value your privacy.
    Focus Taiwan (CNA) uses tracking technologies to provide better reading experiences, but it also respects readers' privacy. Click here to find out more about Focus Taiwan's privacy policy. When you close this window, it means you agree with this policy.