Top presidential aide resigns amid nephew's bribery allegations

08/02/2020 04:33 PM
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Presidential Office
Presidential Office's secretary-general Su Jia-chyuan. CNA file photo

Taipei, Aug. 2 (CNA) Top presidential aide Su Jia-chyuan (蘇嘉全) tendered his resignation Sunday amid bribery allegations targeting his nephew, and the Presidential Office swiftly approved the move later in the day.

Su's role as the Presidential Office's secretary-general will be temporarily filled by his deputy, Liu Chien-sin (劉建忻), the office said in a statement.

In a statement of his own, Su apologized for causing President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) trouble over allegations that his nephew, Legislator Su Chen-ching (蘇震清), took bribes from businessman Lee Heng-lung (李恆隆) to help him regain control of Pacific SOGO Department Store.

He insisted, however, that he and his wife have never been investigated for corruption or indicted on related charges in his three decades in politics nor has he ever attempted to use his position to cover up alleged misconduct by family members.

Su said he was resigning to prevent causing further trouble for the president and to allow investigators to conduct a thorough investigation into the corruption allegations against Su Chen-ching.

Su served as secretary-general to Tsai starting May 20 when the president began her second term. He previously served as legislative speaker from 2016 to January 2020.

Su Chen-ching is one of the five incumbent and former lawmakers accused of taking bribes from Lee to help him in his legal battle against the Far Eastern Group over ownership of the Pacific SOGO Department Store chain.

The Taipei District Court was to hold a hearing Sunday afternoon to review a prosecutors request to detain Su along with three other incumbent lawmakers and one former lawmaker because of the serious nature of the allegations.

(By Yen Su-ping and Joseph Yeh)

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