Taiwan's Lee Kang-sheng wins Golden Horse Best Leading Actor award

2013/11/24 00:22:56

Taipei, Nov. 23 (CNA) Lee Kang-sheng of Taiwan won the Golden Horse Award for Best Leading Actor Saturday for his performance as a homeless single father in "Stray Dogs."

“Making films is very hard for me. Making good films is even harder. Winning best actor from a field of so many award-winning actors is mission impossible,” the 45 year-old said during his acceptance speech at the awards ceremony in Taipei.

Lee, who received the award from Taiwanese actress Brigitte Lin and Hong Kong actor Sean Lau, thanked the judges, director Tsai Ming-liang and his family for their support.

Also in the running were Hong Kong's Tony Leung Chiu-wai who starred in "The Grandmaster," Hong Kong's Tony Leung Ka-fai for his role in "Cold War," Taiwan's Jimmy Wang Yu in "Soul," and Hong Kong's Nick Cheung in "Unbeatable."

In "Stray Dogs," directed by Taiwan-based Malaysian director Tsai Ming-liang, Lee plays a single father of two, who earns a pittance on the streets holding advertising signs for a real estate development.

"Stray Dogs" features Tsai's trademark long static shots and slow pace that convey the recurring theme of loneliness and alienation often found in the director's works. The film includes a 12-minute scene showing Lee eating rotting vegetables.

Lee has been nominated for the Best Leading Actor award once before, in 1994 for his role in Tsai's "Vive L'Amour."

Tsai discovered Lee at a video game store in Taipei in 1991, and since then Lee has appeared in all of the director's feature films.

In 2003, Lee directed his first film "The Missing." His second directorial piece, "Help Me Eros," was nominated for the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 2007.

The star-studded ceremony, considered the Chinese-language Oscars, is one of the most prestigious film events in the Chinese-speaking world.

(By Christie Chen)
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