TSMC hires ex-Intel executive to enhance global communications - Focus Taiwan

TSMC hires ex-Intel executive to enhance global communications

Taipei, Jan. 14 (CNA) Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), the world's largest chipmaker, said Monday that it has recruited former Intel executive Peter Cleveland to lead its global communication efforts.

With TSMC's emergence as an international company, Cleveland will work to enhance its communications with its stakeholders, including government officials worldwide, TSMC spokesperson Nina Kao (高孟華) said.

Cleveland served as vice president for global public policy at the American semiconductor giant Intel Corp. and was its chief lobbyist for more than 10 years.

According to international news reports, Cleveland was recruited by TSMC to lead its lobbying efforts in Washington as it seeks to deal with the effects of the trade tensions between the United States and China, but Kao said that was not the case.

Cleveland's recruitment has nothing to do with the trade disputes between Washington and Beijing, but rather is aimed at boosting TSMC's international communications efforts, she said.

Although the U.S. and China are scheduled to sign a phase-one trade deal later this week to resolve their trade disputes, the U.S. reportedly will maintain its blacklisting of Chinese telecom equipment giant Huawei Technologies Inc., one of TSMC's biggest clients.

When Huawei was first blacklisted by the U.S., Cleveland said the restrictions would affect not only Chinese enterprises but also their American counterparts and that Washington and Beijing should find an effective solution on a reciprocal basis.

At Intel, Cleveland headed a team of 200 lawyers and professionals and was the company's leading lobbyist, according to a Bloomberg news report. His expertise includes antitrust reviews, 5G spectrum allocations, and global IP enforcement and protection, the report said.

Before joining Intel, Cleveland served as chief of staff at the office of California Senator Dianne Feinstein, according to the report.

(By Chang Chien-chung and Frances Huang)

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