Soil symphony: amateurs use songs & music to grow 14.7 kg cabbage

01/10/2022 05:30 PM
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A woman carries a huge cabbage. Photo courtesy of the Kaohsiung City government
A woman carries a huge cabbage. Photo courtesy of the Kaohsiung City government

Kaohsiung, Jan. 10 (CNA) The secret to growing a 14.7-kilogram cabbage? Serenade your sprouts daily -- that's at least according to a group of green-fingered amateurs from Kaohsiung First Community University.

The green Goliath -- 10 times larger than an average cabbage -- was grown by a group of 52 novice farmers at the community college who had spent the last year learning from scratch how to grow vegetables.

At a fundraiser on Saturday where the group displayed and sold the fruits of their labors for charity, members of the club said that singing and playing music to their patch of tomatoes, pumpkins, green peppers, and cabbages had been key to the successful harvest.

Club head Yu Shu-yen (游淑燕) told CNA that each member of the club had been assigned a plot of land measuring 20 ping, or about 66 square meters, to farm after completing 18 lessons on soil, water control, plant diseases and insect pests, plant selection, and ways to grow vegetables and fruits.

Club members all cultivated their own crops without using pesticides or chemical fertilizer, and Yu said that they played music and sang their favorite songs to the vegetables every day to help them "grow up healthily."

A cabbage weighing 14.7kg. Photo courtesy of the Kaohsiung City government
A cabbage weighing 14.7kg. Photo courtesy of the Kaohsiung City government

Speaking of the 14.7 kg cabbage that stole the show at Saturday's event, Yu said that certain species of cabbages normally take four to five months to mature but that this one had been harvested only four months after it was planted.

The leafy leviathan could have grown bigger if it had not been harvested for the charity event, with Yu attributing the size of the cruciferous colossus to the "friendly farmland" on which it grew.

"It's the reward for the club's long-term dedication to the promotion of non-toxic agriculture," Yu said, adding that such an approach safeguarded against pollution.

(By Tseng I-ning and Elizabeth Hsu)

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