Taoyuan authorities arrest suspected drug dealers from Vietnam

10/24/2020 08:28 PM
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Photo courtesy of Taoyuan District Prosecutors Office
Photo courtesy of Taoyuan District Prosecutors Office

Taipei, Oct. 24 (CNA) Three Vietnamese nationals suspected of dealing drugs were arrested by Taoyuan authorities at a local bar early Saturday, and another 100 people were brought in for questioning on suspicion of drug use.

Acting on a tipoff, police said the three suspects from Vietnam were found carrying narcotics packed in coffee sachets, as well as ketamine and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), a type of stimulant with hallucinogenic effects.

Some 122 customers present at the bar, of which 108 were Vietnamese and 14 were Taiwanese, were brought in by the police for questioning as officers also found various types of drugs at their tables during the raid.

The customers underwent urine tests to determine whether they were on narcotics, but no results were available as of Saturday evening.

Photo courtesy of Taoyuan District Prosecutors Office
Photo courtesy of Taoyuan District Prosecutors Office

Seven of the 108 Vietnamese were also found to have absconded from their legal employers in Taiwan, police said.

According to the Taoyuan District Prosecutors Office, the establishment located on Zhongzheng North Road in Luzhu District is a popular hangout among migrant workers in the area.

It was actually operating illegally Saturday, after having its license suspended for two months on Sept. 1 because of the repeated presence of drugs during random police checks.

Also Saturday, Taoyuan prosecutors said that based on provisions in the Narcotics Hazard Prevention Act, operators found guilty of mismanagement and failing to strictly impose a no-drug environment could be fined up to NT$1 million (US$34,920), and in serious cases, be shut down by the government.

(By Yeh Chen and Ko Lin)

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