Focus Taiwan App
Download

TPP's Ko vows to elevate Cabinet government role if elected

10/09/2023 06:11 PM
To activate the text-to-speech service, please first agree to the privacy policy below.
Taiwan People's Party presidential candidate Ko Wen-je stands in front of a banner promoting an elevated role of the Republic of China's (Taiwan) Cabinet during a campaign in Taipei Monday. CNA photo Oct. 9, 2023
Taiwan People's Party presidential candidate Ko Wen-je stands in front of a banner promoting an elevated role of the Republic of China's (Taiwan) Cabinet during a campaign in Taipei Monday. CNA photo Oct. 9, 2023

Taipei, Oct. 9 (CNA) Taiwan People's Party (TPP) presidential candidate Ko Wen-je (柯文哲) said Monday that he would elevate the Cabinet's role in government, enshrine a parliamentary democracy system into the constitution and create the position of Prime Minister of the Republic of China if elected.

Noting that Taiwan has experienced three transitions of power since its first direct presidential election in 1996, Ko said he has been considering whether one problem with Taiwan's system is that the country's politics is dominated by seven elected officials - the president and mayors of the country's six municipalities.

"The winner takes it all, and there are no checks and balances whatsoever," he said, adding that although mayors face questions from city councilors, the president is not subjected to parliamentary oversight, so strings can be pulled behind the scenes.

Ko added that his main priority would be the country's lasting peace and stability, not his term in office.

The 2024 election is a good opportunity to end the autocratic presidential system and return the country's power to the people, Ko said, adding that if elected, he would abolish what he calls the "elective monarchy system" and replace it with a Cabinet-run government.

Ko said he would propose that the president's appointment of the premier be subject to legislative consent and that Cabinet members be appointed following hearings by various Legislative Yuan committees.

He also indicated he would advocate reducing the number of government branches, which currently includes the Executive, the Legislative, the Judicial, the Examination, and the Control Yuan, to three, by removing the Examination and the Control Yuan.

Ko said he would push for the open selection of senior civil servants and board members of state-run enterprises and scrap the policy that makes special central government budgets a regular practice.

According to Ko, he would propose lowering the voting age to 18 from 20 and the minimum age a candidate needs to be to run for public office to 20 from 23 by amending the Constitution.

Ko also said he would seek to lower the 5 percent electoral threshold that a political party must surpass to 3 percent of the overall vote for political parties in order for a party to participate in the distribution of the 34 legislator-at-large seats.

In response, ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) spokesman Chang Chih-hao (張志豪) criticized Ko for contradicting himself, saying that while he is apparently pushing to elevate the Cabinet's role, it is the monarchy that is on his mind.

(By Chen Chun-hua, Yeh Su-ping and Evelyn Kao)

Enditem/kb

    0:00
    /
    0:00
    We value your privacy.
    Focus Taiwan (CNA) uses tracking technologies to provide better reading experiences, but it also respects readers' privacy. Click here to find out more about Focus Taiwan's privacy policy. When you close this window, it means you agree with this policy.
    172.30.142.35