Proposed amendments list 'acts of omission' as form of animal abuse

04/12/2021 08:37 PM
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Pixabay photo for illustrative purposes only
Pixabay photo for illustrative purposes only

Taipei, April 12 (CNA) A series of proposed revisions to the Animal Protection Act, including a section that adds "acts of omission" as a form of animal abuse, cleared the Legislature's Economic Committee Monday.

Existing Article 3.1.10 of the Animal Protection Act lists "using violence, improper drugs or other means to harm an animal or render it unable to perform physical functions properly" as forms of animal abuse.

According to the proposed amendment passed on Monday, the lawmakers added "improper use of objects" and "acts of omission" as forms of animal abuse.

Should such improper use of objects and omissions result in death, injury or vital organ failure of an animal, the violator will face a fine of between NT$200,000 (US$6,962) and NT$2 million, plus a maximum 2-year prison term, according to the proposed amendments.

Legislator Chen Ting-fei (陳亭妃) of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party, one of the initiators of the proposed amendments, told reporters that "acts of omission" means a lack of proper care and is a form of passive cruelty.

Examples of severe animal neglect include starvation that could lead to pain and suffering for an animal, and thus should also be seen as a form of abuse punishable by law, Chen said.

Meanwhile, lawmakers in the committee also cleared proposed amendments to revise Article 14-1 of the same act.

The article currently stipulates that one cannot capture animals with "explosive material, poison, traps, electricity, corrosive substances, or firearms, without the prior consent of the competent authorities."

The proposed revision deletes the phrase "without the prior consent of the competent authorities."

The proposed revisions to the Animal Protection Act will now be sent to the Legislature's plenary session for further review.

(By Lin Yu-hsuan and Joseph Yeh)

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