Taiwan's Indonesian community celebrates Batik Day in Taipei

10/03/2021 07:24 PM
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A traditional dance performance at Batik and Ikat Festival 2021. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
A traditional dance performance at Batik and Ikat Festival 2021. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021

Taipei, Oct. 3 (CNA) Colorful costumes and cheerful music flowed from a museum in downtown Taipei Sunday at a festival honoring the art of batik, a traditional wax-resist dyeing technique from Indonesia.

The Batik & Ikat Festival 2021, organized by the Indonesia Diaspora Network (IDN) in Taiwan and held at National Taiwan Museum's Namen Park branch, featured a series of Indonesian cultural activities, including traditional dancing and choirs, as well as batik art.

Taiwan-based Indonesians from all walks of life attended the event, which featured a fashion show with runway models in ikat shawls and long skirts made from beautifully dyed batiks.

Ikat refers to a textile-patterning technique where yarns are bound to resist dye before weaving, as well as the textiles made using this tied-yarn dye-resist technique.

A modal walks down the runway. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
A modal walks down the runway. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Modals pose for photos. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Modals pose for photos. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
A modal poses on the runway. CNA photo Oct. 4, 2021
A modal poses on the runway. CNA photo Oct. 4, 2021

Inggrid Chandra, the festival's project manager, said batik and ikat culture runs through the Indonesian bloodline.

She added that every year IDN organizes a batik-themed festival to raise awareness of the tradition on National Batik Day on Oct. 2.

Oct. 2 marks the anniversary of when batik culture was added to UNESCO's Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2009.

"Starting from a deep love for Indonesian culture and country, we always do our best to appreciate and preserve the batik and ikat culture. In addition to raising awareness to our fellow Indonesian brothers and sisters who are abroad, we also want to share the culture with our international friends," Chandra told CNA.

Indonesian traditional costume and gown designer Yayuk Sri Rahayu (center) poses with models wearing her creations. An Indonesian caretaker of 13 years, she plans to manage her own costume rental business in Indonesia next year. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Indonesian traditional costume and gown designer Yayuk Sri Rahayu (center) poses with models wearing her creations. An Indonesian caretaker of 13 years, she plans to manage her own costume rental business in Indonesia next year. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021

Sakshi Saraswat, 24, an Indian PhD student in Taiwan who participated in the festival as one of the runway models, said she believed that batik in her country originally came from Indonesia and that she wanted to learn more about the culture.

Saraswat walked up and down the runway twice, the first time wearing a batik long skirt with peacock motifs, and then a second time wearing an ikat shawl, with its characteristic blurred design on full display.

"I feel so good, I have never done a runway before and it boosted my confidence a lot. Also, I feel more Indonesian now," Saraswat said.

Sakshi Saraswat (right). CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Sakshi Saraswat (right). CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Jewelry and clothing designer Kartika Dewi (left) and Sakshi Saraswat. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Jewelry and clothing designer Kartika Dewi (left) and Sakshi Saraswat. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021

During a speech at the festival, Representative Budi Santoso of the Indonesian Economic and Trade Office (IETO) to Taipei said his country would like to share the beauty of batik with people of all races.

He also encouraged people around the world to wear batik clothing saying that it could be found everywhere.

"Batik Day reminds us that we have a colorful civilization. Batik is a historical record of beauty," Budi said.

Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso makes a batik design. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso makes a batik design. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso (right) shares his batik design with members of the Indonesian community. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso (right) shares his batik design with members of the Indonesian community. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021

Indonesia's Minister for Foreign Affairs Retno Marsudi said Sunday her ministry would continue to present batik on the international stage as a part of Indonesia's identity every chance it gets, according to Indonesian national news agency ANTARA.

"Mainstreaming batik to be a part of the education curriculum and training diplomats should be done in order to improve the effort of promoting Indonesian batik abroad," ANTARA reported.

Fajar Nuradi, director of IETO's Indonesian Citizens Protection and Social Cultural Department, reiterated the call to strengthen the role of the batik as one of the pillars of national cultural identity among overseas Indonesians.

Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso (right) and Fajar Nuradi (front, left), director of IETO
Indonesian Representative to Taipei Budi Santoso (right) and Fajar Nuradi (front, left), director of IETO's Indonesian Citizens Protection and Social Cultural Department. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021

"Therefore, the main objective of this batik festival event is to strengthen the pride to wear batik among Indonesian citizens abroad and, at the same time, to promote the beauty of our batik to the world," Fajar said.

IDN has held batik-themed festivals annually since 2017, with hundreds of participants in attendance each year. However, due to the COVID-19 restrictions implemented by the museum, only 50 people indoors and 80 outdoors were allowed in attendance at the 2021 edition at any given time.

Enditem/ASG

A woman makes her batik designs. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
A woman makes her batik designs. CNA photo Oct. 3, 2021
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