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Taiwan takes criticism of Olympic team's outfit in stride

2014/02/09 20:19:38

Taipei, Feb. 9 (CNA) The secretary-general of the Chinese Taipei Olympic Committee said Sunday that he respected an online critique of the outfits Taiwanese athletes wore at the opening ceremony of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, on Feb. 7.

Chen Kuo-i said he had no comment on opinions of how national teams were dressed at the Games' opening ceremony of the Sochi Olympics because "views on fashion designs vary from person to person."

The committee, however, respects the criticism by a blogger on Yahoo! Sports and will seek improvement in the future, Chen added.

In the article by Greg Wyshynski titled "Best and Worst Dressed Olympic Nations in Sochi Opening Ceremony," the writer described Taiwan's team as being dressed like house painters.

"From a distance, we assumed they had just gotten back from choir practice. These floor-length coats are neither practical nor attractive, unless of course you're planning on doing some house painting or joining a cult for the winter," Wyshynski wrote.

The blue-color uniform was sponsored by Mizuno (Taiwan) Corp., said Chen, explaining that Taiwan had only a minimal budget for its participation in the Winter Olympics and was not out to make a splash with the uniforms. The committee was extremely grateful simply to have a company help sponsor the team's presence in Sochi, Chen said.

Mizuno (Taiwan) manager Yang Fu-cheng said the outfits supplied by his company for Taiwan's team at the opening ceremony were imported from Japan because Taiwan does not produce the overcoat that was used.

Though the overcoat was criticized for its appearance, Yang said its blue color was representative of Taiwan, whose flag is blue, white and red, and it was highly functional, with a wind-resistant design able to keep athletes warm in the cold environment.

Mizuno is a Japanese sports equipment and sportswear brand.

(By Lin Hung-han and Elizabeth Hsu)
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